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Carrie
by Stephen King

Discographies
Index | Novels | Other | Richard Bachman | Movies | TV

Books
Black House | Christine

 

Reviews

Why read Carrie? Stephen King himself has said that he finds his early work "raw," and Brian De Palma's movie was so successful that we feel like we have read the novel even if we never have. The simple answer is that this is a very scary story, one that works as well--if not better--on the page as on the screen. Carrie White, menaced by bullies at school and her religious nut of a mother at home, gradually discovers that she has telekinetic powers, powers that will eventually be turned on her tormentors. King has a way of getting under the skin of his readers by creating an utterly believable world that throbs with menace before finally exploding. He builds the tension in this early work by piecing together extracts from newspaper reports, journals, and scientific papers, as well as more traditional first- and third-person narrative in order to reveal what lurks beneath the surface of Chamberlain, Maine.

News item from the Westover (ME) weekly Enterprise, August 19, 1966: "Rain of Stones Reported: It was reliably reported by several persons that a rain of stones fell from a clear blue sky on Carlin Street in the town of Chamberlain on August 17th."

Although the supernatural pyrotechnics are handled with King's customary aplomb, it is the carefully drawn portrait of the little horrors of small towns, high schools, and adolescent sexuality that give this novel its power, and assures its place in the King canon. 
--Simon Leake

On The Flap

Carrie was the odd one at school; the one whose reflexes were always off in games, whose clothes never really fit, who never got the point of a joke.  And so she became the joke, the brunt of teenaged cruelties that puzzled her as much as they wounded her.

There was hardly any comfort in playing her private game, because like so many things in Carrie's life it was sinful.  Or so her mother said.  Carrie could make things move -- by concentrating on them, by willing them to move.  Small things, like marbles, would start dancing.  Or a candle would fall.  A door would lock.  This was her game -- her power -- her sin, firmly repressed like everything else about Carrie.

One act of kindness, as spontaneous as the vicious jokes of her classmates, offered Carrie a new look at herself that night of the senior prom.  But another -- of furious cruelty -- forever changed things and turned her clandestine game into a weapon of horror and destruction.

She made a lighted candle fall, and she locked the doors...

On The Cover

This is a novel about the other world in this world.  It is the chilling story of a girl and her strange power.

Carrie White could produce motion in objects without contact or other physical means.  This little-known phenomenon, known as telekinesis, is produced in individuals under circumstances of extreme psychic stress.  And Carrie was indeed pushed beyond human limits, as she unleashed her frightening power upon a small New England town.

Stephen King's story will stun your sensibilities, jangle your nerve endings, and make you wonder even more...

Buy The Book

Carrie

Paperback
Amazon.com
Half.com

Carrie

Hardcover
Amazon.com
Half.com

Search for Carrie at eBay.


All formats
 
Print
Carrie (1974) -
Mass Market Paperback (2002), Spanish Paperback (2001), Paperback (2000), Library Binding (1999), Paperback (1994), Large Print Hardcover (1994), German Paperback (1994), Spanish Paperback (1994), Hardcover (1993), Spanish Paperback (1992), Paperback (1991), Spanish Paperback (1984), Mass Market Paperback (1981), Paperback (1975)
Digital
Carrie -
Microsoft Reader Download, Adobe Reader Download
Audio
Carrie (unabridged) -
Audible.com, Compact Disc, Audio Cassette
Video
Carrie (1976) -
VHS (2002), DVD (2001)
The Rage: Carrie 2 (1999) -
VHS (2000), DVD (2001)


Books
Black House  | Christine

Discographies
Index | Novels | Other | Richard Bachman | Movies | TV

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